Places to Visit

The North-Coast of Northern Ireland boasts a wide range of beautiful, exciting places to visit with something for everyone.

GIANTS CAUSEWAY

Giant’s Causeway, renowned for its polygonal columns of layered basalt, is the only World Heritage Site in N Ireland. Resulting from a volcanic eruption 60 million years ago, this is the focal point for a designated Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty and has attracted visitors for centuries. It harbours a wealth of local and natural history.

CARRICK-A-REDE

A short coastal footpath leads to Carrick-a-Rede Rope Bridge. On the way, there are wonderful vantage points to stop and take in the natural beauty. Suspended almost 100 ft (30 m) above sea level, the Carrick-a-Rede Rope Bridge was first erected by salmon fishermen over 200 years ago and is now a major tourist attraction on the North Coast. Crossing the bridge is a thrilling experience and brave explorers will be rewarded with stunning views.

WHITEROCKS BEACH

Awarded the prestigious Blue Flag Award again in 2015, Whiterocks Beach has become a favourite with locals and a must see destination for international visitors. The beach, situated just off the Causeway Coastal Route, enjoys a stunning natural coastal location, with the limestone cliffs of the White Rocks stretching from Curran Strand to Dunluce Castle. These soft, sedimentary rocks have been carved through centuries into a labyrinth of caves and arches.

MUSSENDEN TEMPLE

Mussenden Temple is located in the beautiful surroundings of Downhill Demesne near Castlerock in County Londonderry. It perches dramatically on a 120 ft cliff top, high above the Atlantic Ocean on the north-western coast of Northern Ireland, offering spectacular views westwards over Downhill Strand towards Magilligan Point and County Donegal and to the east Castlerock beach towards Portstewart, Portrush and Fair Head.

DARK HEDGES

This beautiful avenue of beech trees was planted by the Stuart family in the eighteenth century. It was intended as a compelling landscape feature to impress visitors as they approached the entrance to their Georgian mansion, Gracehill House. Two centuries later, the trees remain a magnificent sight and have become one of the most photographed natural phenomena in Northern Ireland. In fact, the iconic trees have been used as a filming location in HBO's epic series Game of Thrones.

BALLINTOY HARBOUR

The small fishing harbour can be found at the end of a small steep road down Knocksaughey Hill. The village itself, which is 1km from the harbour, has a charming array of small shops, two churches, restaurants, commercial and social facilities. For those looking to capture a true sense of Irish rural life, it is an ideal stop over whilst touring the coastal route. It has been used as a filming location in HBO's epic series Game of Thrones.

PORTSTEWART STRAND

Between Portstewart and the mouth of the River Bann lies the golden sands and domineering sand dunes of Portstewart Strand. This area of natural beauty and of scientific interest is owned and managed by the National Trust. A year round mecca for holiday makers, Portstewart Strand holds the prestigious Blue Flag award for the management, cleanliness and quality of water and it is also one of the few remaining beaches in Ireland where cars still have access and permission to drive onto the beach.

THE PROMENADE

Portstewart is an upmarket tourist haven with a spectacular beach, a gorgeous harbour, promenade, championship golf courses, great restaurants, cafes, parks, icecream parlours and even outdoor swimming pools and a childrens pleasure beach. Portstewart has many places where you can relax and watch the world go by. It was a well loved Victorian seaside Port which has retained both its heritage and public appeal.

BINEVENAGH MOUNTAIN

Take a scenic drive along Binevenagh and explore the panoramic views along Binevenagh Mountain and Lake. Marking the western extent of the Antrim Plateau, Binevenagh Mountain was formed 60 million years ago by molten lava. The steep cliffs stretching over six miles, providing a stunning backdrop of panoramic views across the peninsula of Magilligan and dominating the skyline over the villages of Bellarena, Downhill, Castlerock and Benone beach.

OLD BUSHMILLS DISTILLERY

Bushmills Irish Whiskey is made at Ireland’s oldest working distillery in County Antrim, Northern Ireland on the beautiful North Coast. The Bushmills Brand Experience encompasses guided tours around a working distillery with all the associated sights and smells, tutored whiskey tastings, a specialist whiskey shop and a well stocked gift shop with exclusive Bushmills merchanise.

ROYAL PORTRUSH GOLF CLUB

Founded in 1888, the legendary Royal Portrush Golf Club has two Championship Courses – the renowned Dunluce Course and the smaller but equally enjoyable Valley Course. Both command impressive views across the North Atlantic with breathtaking views of Scotland and Donegal but the golf is even more spectacular.

BARRY'S AMUSEMENTS

Established for over 70 years, Barry’s is the largest amusement park in Ireland with the very latest rides for indoor and outdoor entertainment. Barry's offers something for everyone - of all ages. With ample car and coach parking. The whole family is guaranteed a great day out.

THE JET CENTRE COMPLEX

The Jet Centre Complex located in Colearine offers a wide variety of activities to suit everyone. The complex boasts a cinema, arcade, indoor play area, restaurant, bowling and an outdoor mini golf course. So come along and enjoy a fun filled family day out!

GLENARIFF FOREST

The unique Waterfall Walkway, opened 80 years ago, has been significantly upgraded along its 3 mile length which passes through a National Nature Reserve. Three waterfalls provide a rich backdrop for photographers, as do the other forest trails that offer panoramic landscapes and peaceful riverside walks. A visitor centre, exhibition, interactive display, shop, caravan/camping site (open Easter - October) Laragh Lodge Restaurant (open all year round) complement this "gateway to the Glens". Disabled access.

DOWNHILL FOREST

A walk through Downhill Forest will allow you to view one of Northern Irelands fattest Sitka spruce (in 1962 the girth was approximately 6m), an Early Christian Promontory Fort and an old water powered sawmill with its lade running round the small lake in the middle of this woodland. The lake was originally designed as a fishpond, a number of Mallard ducks have taken up residence. Both the waymarked walks pass by this elongated pond.